After the recent announcement from Facebook and due to the growing success of Microsoft’s new search engine, Bing, Google is having to step up its game in the search engine market in order to keep up with the competition, so has therefore released a new version of its search engine, that has been codenamed ‘Caffeine’.

The interface of this new version, of the current market leader, is reported to appear almost exactly the same as the one we have become accustomed to, however it should deliver more comprehensive, accurate and faster results than the previous version.

This new project is said to be the “next-generation architecture for Google’s web search” and even though many users are predicted to not even notice the changes, due to the fact that the results are going to change, this could have a big affect of businesses and website owners as their sites are likely to rank differently for some keyword phrases.

For this reason Google has decided to open a web developer preview, in the hope to collect influential feedback that can help further improve the product and ultimately deliver what the users are looking for and iron out any issues.

Unlike previous search experiments Google has conducted, it appears that this new version could ultimately completely replace the system that we are currently using, rather than simply be incorporated into it, like Google introduced previously, with SearchMash.

Contradictory to Microsoft’s new search engine, Google do not intend to alter the overall appearance of the platform, but just improve the relevancy and speed of the results. The official blog post suggests that the new version of the search engine will consist of more advanced crawlers, which will hopefully lead to a more comprehensive search of the web and therefore a more relevant and useful list of results.

As with any changes Google makes to it’s platform this will ultimately lead website developers and SEOs to reconsider the way sites are optimised, and try to discover new ways to take advantage of the new platform, but we hope that the main rules we still apply, and good quality content and accessible infrastructure will remain most important.