Every once in a while, it can be nice to look outside of your business for someone who can help bring an idea to life. Artists, musicians, filmmakers and designers that align with your brand provide access to a whole new audience, and while it can be difficult to find the right people, there are ways to track them down.

But first, some examples.

KENZO x Culturesport TV – Primary Colours campaign

The campaign features hyper-real CGI anime-style characters and a retro interactive drum machine, named the KENZO CS909; it’s uber-geeky, colourful, and nostalgic.

Kenzo Primary Colours Campaign

It’s also delivered in a very high-end, polished, yet quirky way, which ties in well with the KENZO brand.

You can check it out here.

Pringle of Scotland x David Shrigley

Pringle of Scotland commissioned Glasgow-based artist David Shrigley to produce an animated film that depicted how the making of jumpers and cardigans had evolved throughout the history of the Scottish brand.

Pringle has never been afraid to collaborate with influencers, artists, and fellow famous Scots, showing that it has its finger on the pulse, without ever forgetting its heritage.

It does perhaps come more easily to fashion brands, but there is no reason that your brand can’t collaborate with a creative too – it’s just about finding someone who is the right fit for you.

Here’s an example of how a ‘boring’ business can embrace creatives.

A creative campaign for a company that sells business mobile phone contracts

Not the most exciting proposition in the world, are they? But businesses everywhere need them!

To move away from the hard sell typically associated with this sector, how about commissioning a digital designer/filmmaker to create a campaign based on the most popular business phones over the last 10 years – people tend to like nostalgia, and tech geeks often enjoy retrospective content.

Or how about working with an artist that can create something beautiful from old mobile phones – you could invite people to send theirs to you to become part of the sculpture and then auction it off for charity.

Alternatively, you could partner with a leather craftsman to create beautiful bespoke leather cases that can be won in a giveaway.

All of these campaigns are related to the product (mobile phones) but do not focus on the hard sell at all.

Finding the creatives that work for you and your audience

  • Understanding your demographic is key. Look for what they talk about and share on social media the most. Then, begin by planning exactly who you want the content to appeal to, and what format you want it to be delivered in.
  • Once you have decided what the brief is and what medium will appeal to your audience the most, it’s time to start hunting down the right person to work with.
  • When you are happy with the person you choose to partner with, determine what it is they can offer your business, and what you can offer them. Explain how you will help them to gain exposure, and ask for the same from them.
  • What is it that you want to collaborate with them on? Something limited edition? Something to offer as a prize? Be clear about what you expect from them, and make sure they can stick to deadlines.

Not sure where to start looking for potential partners?

After deciding what it is you want to offer your audience, start searching social media for relevant hashtags. A tool like Audisense and the Twitter ‘Who to follow’ function can help to find partners online, and galleries and art and craft fairs can also be great places to find hidden talent.

If you have a business that could support the creative industry, this can be a way in, too. Show that you support the community by launching a whole campaign around them, backed up with resources and information that helps them, like insurance company PolicyBee did for freelancers. Not only did this raise awareness for their target demographic, it has also provided a great way to discover people to work with on future campaigns.

What do you think? Can any brand bring a campaign to life by partnering with the right person, or are there businesses out there that are just way too boring to have a creative element introduced? Let us know!